Welcome To Our State Approved Courses 
Get Electronic Health Records (EHR) Certified!

Healthcare Information Technology School of NJ (Health IT School of NJ) courses and classes prepare our graduates to get hired to assist with the implementation of electronic medical records and/or electronic health records (EMR and EHR) in various types of healthcare facilities, including hospitals, physician practices, clinics, ambulatory surgical centers, and public health facilities. You must visit Health IT School NJ Website and complete our Professional Assessment Form to get started in either of these Pre-Enrollment Training Tracks:

Pre-Enrollment Courses:

Each of our Pre-Enrollment Courses (Training Track #1 or Training Track #2) requires 480 Hours (3 - 6 months) of time to complete, depending on how much time a student will devote to each class component. These Pre-Enrollment Courses course consist of nine (9) online class components. Health IT School of NJ registered students, are provided their own Login and Password for 24/7 access to our nationally recognized on-line courses. These student propelled components feature the latest web-based technology, including this "state-of-the-art" interactive Learning Management System, periodic, scheduled live instructor-led web conferencing sessions (you will see, talk to and listen to) our EHR / EMR Certified experts who are actively working for hospitals and clinics nationwide. Through our effective expert person to person, on-the-job-training advice and tutoring, our direct relationships with the top healthcare IT job recruiters and human resource professionals, and knowing this industry so well, our job placement staff here at Health IT School of NJ have first hand knowledge to get our program graduates working for hospitals and clinics nationwide!

Training Track #1: Health IT Workforce - Electronic Health Records (EHR) Analyst I 

Upon completion of the program, students will be available for employment opportunities as EMR and EHR Practice Workflow Analyst, Trainer, or Practice Support Staff to fill the nationally recognized shortage of highly skilled Health IT experts.

Training Track #2: Health IT Workforce - Electronic Health Records (EHR) Analyst II  

Upon completion of the program, students will be available for employment opportunities as EMR and EHR system Implementation Analysts, Technical Analysts, or Help Desk Analysts to fill the nationally recognized shortage of highly skilled Health IT experts.

Thanks to our enhanced online 'state-of-the-art' Learning Management System and distance learning curriculum, we are able to prepare students with the best, most informative training, by preparing them for the Health IT Workforce Competency Examination Program (HIT Pro™). Our program graduates get 5 contined education unit (CEU)s for each HIT Pro™ exam they pass, which may be applied toward an existing American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) Credential.

 

Self Enrollment Classes:

Review the description of each class title detailed and listed below. Click on the class title you would like to purchase and then gain access to our PayPals portal. These are 'Pay as you go' individual online classes available on demand. Classes purchased here, do not include access to our "Live" EHR Expert Instructors. Contact us if you're interested in purchasing Health IT School of NJ "Live" EHR Expert Instructor services, upon your request

These classes have been evaluated by The American Health Data Institute (AHDI) and are preapproved for the respective number of continuing education credits (CECs) for each class listed below

    Click on the Self Enrollment Class title you would like to purchase:

    This component provides a practical experience with a laboratory component (utilizing the VistA for Education program) that will address approaches to assessing, selecting, and configuring EHRs to meet the specific needs of customers and end-users.

    This component covers fundamentals of health workflow process analysis and redesign as a necessary component of complete practice automation.  Process validation and change management are also covered. 

    The component, Health Management Information Systems, is a “theory” component that provides an introduction to health care applications and the systems that use them, health information technology standards, health-related data structures, and enterprise architecture in health care organizations.

    For students without an IT background, this Component provides a basic overview of computer architecture; data organization, representation and structure; structure of programming languages; networking and data communication.  It also includes basic terminology of computing.

    Introduction to Project Management

    An understanding of project management tools and techniques that results in the ability to create and follow a project management plan.

    This component targets those preparing for leadership roles, principles of leadership and effective management of teams.  Emphasis on the leadership modes and styles best suited to IT deployment.

    This component develops the skills necessary to communicate effectively across the full range of roles that will be encountered in healthcare and public health settings.

    This component is specifically for individuals interested in a career in public health. This component will provide an overview of specialized public health applications such as registries, epidemiological databases, biosurvelliance, public health reporting alerts, quality reporting, and how to adopt/use of population health functions for electronic health records and consumer functions for personal health records. In addition, this component will address the potential of public health information technology for health promotion and chronic disease prevention.

    Quality Improvement introduces the concepts of health IT and practice workflow redesign as instruments of quality improvement.  It addresses establishing a culture that supports increased quality and safety. It also discusses approaches to assessing patient safety issues and implementing quality management and reporting through electronic systems.

    This component explains specific terminology used by workers in health care and public health. This is NOT a course in data representation or standards.

    Training and Instructional Design

    This component will provide an overview of learning management systems, instructional design software tools, teaching techniques and strategies, evaluation of learner competencies, maintenance of training records, and measurement of training program effectiveness. In addition, this component will discuss selecting and implementing Web 2.0 technologies as instructional technologies given a specific platform and training programs.

    This component provides a practical experience with a laboratory component (utilizing the VistA for Education program) that will address approaches to assessing, selecting, and configuring EHRs to meet the specific needs of customers and end-users.

    The component, Health Management Information Systems, is a “theory” component that provides an introduction to health care applications and the systems that use them, health information technology standards, health-related data structures, and enterprise architecture in health care organizations.

    This component covers fundamentals of selection, installation and maintenance of typical Electronic Health Records (EHR) systems. Students will be introduced to the principles underlying system configuration including basic hardware and software components, principles of system selection, planning, testing, troubleshooting, and final deployment.  System security and procedures will also be introduced in this component.

    This component is a survey of how healthcare and public health are organized and services delivered in the US.  It covers public policy, relevant organizations and their interrelationships, professional roles, legal and regulatory issues, and payment systems.  It also addresses health reform initiatives in the US.

    For students without an IT background, this Component provides a basic overview of computer architecture; data organization, representation and structure; structure of programming languages; networking and data communication.  It also includes basic terminology of computing.

    This unit will address the OSI, including the purpose and content of each of its seven layers:  physical, data link, network, transport, session, presentation, and application. Products, processes, protocols and tools at each level will be explained. This unit will also focus on the flow of data through the models as data is transmitted and receive by end devices.

    This component develops the skills necessary to communicate effectively across the full range of roles that will be encountered in healthcare and public health settings.

    This component explains specific terminology used by workers in health care and public health. This is NOT a course in data representation or standards.

    This is a laboratory component.  Students will work with simulated systems or real systems with simulated data.  As they play the role of practitioners using these systems, they will learn what is happening “under the hood.”  They will experience threats to security and appreciate the need for standards, high levels of usability, and how errors can occur. Materials must support hands-on experience in computer labs and on-site in health organizations.

    This component is a survey of how healthcare and public health are organized and services delivered in the US.  It covers public policy, relevant organizations and their interrelationships, professional roles, legal and regulatory issues, and payment systems.  It also addresses health reform initiatives in the US.

    This component is a survey of how healthcare and public health are organized and services delivered in the US.  It covers public policy, relevant organizations and their interrelationships, professional roles, legal and regulatory issues, and payment systems.  It also addresses health reform initiatives in the US.

    For individuals not familiar with healthcare, this component addresses job expectations in healthcare settings.  It discusses how care is organized within a practice setting, privacy laws, and professional and ethical issues encountered in the workplace.

    This component explains specific terminology used by workers in health care and public health. This is NOT a course in data representation or standards.

    For students without an IT background, this Component provides a basic overview of computer architecture; data organization, representation and structure; structure of programming languages; networking and data communication.  It also includes basic terminology of computing.

    The component, Health Management Information Systems, is a “theory” component that provides an introduction to health care applications and the systems that use them, health information technology standards, health-related data structures, and enterprise architecture in health care organizations.

    This component covers fundamentals of selection, installation and maintenance of typical Electronic Health Records (EHR) systems. Students will be introduced to the principles underlying system configuration including basic hardware and software components, principles of system selection, planning, testing, troubleshooting, and final deployment.  System security and procedures will also be introduced in this component.

    This is a laboratory component.  Students will work with simulated systems or real systems with simulated data.  As they play the role of practitioners using these systems, they will learn what is happening “under the hood.”  They will experience threats to security and appreciate the need for standards, high levels of usability, and how errors can occur. Materials must support hands-on experience in computer labs and on-site in health organizations.

    This unit will address the OSI, including the purpose and content of each of its seven layers:  physical, data link, network, transport, session, presentation, and application. Products, processes, protocols and tools at each level will be explained. This unit will also focus on the flow of data through the models as data is transmitted and receive by end devices.

    This component covers fundamentals of health workflow process analysis and redesign as a necessary component of complete practice automation.  Process validation and change management are also covered. 

    This component provides a practical experience with a laboratory component (utilizing the VistA for Education program) that will address approaches to assessing, selecting, and configuring EHRs to meet the specific needs of customers and end-users.

    Quality Improvement introduces the concepts of health IT and practice workflow redesign as instruments of quality improvement.  It addresses establishing a culture that supports increased quality and safety. It also discusses approaches to assessing patient safety issues and implementing quality management and reporting through electronic systems.

    This component will provide an in-depth discussion in Vendor-Specific Systems, focusing specifically in areas such as system and database architectures used in commercial Electronic Health Records (EHRs), vendor strategies for terminology, knowledge management, ways to assess decision support capabilities in EHRs, and finally vendor-specific training (go-live strategies). 

    This component develops the skills necessary to communicate effectively across the full range of roles that will be encountered in healthcare and public health settings.

    This component will discussion of rapid prototyping, user-centered design understanding effects of new technology workflow on downstream processes; facilitation of unit-wide focus groups or simulation.

    Training and Instructional Design

    This component will provide an overview of learning management systems, instructional design software tools, teaching techniques and strategies, evaluation of learner competencies, maintenance of training records, and measurement of training program effectiveness. In addition, this component will discuss selecting and implementing Web 2.0 technologies as instructional technologies given a specific platform and training programs.

    This component is a survey of how healthcare and public health are organized and services delivered in the US.  It covers public policy, relevant organizations and their interrelationships, professional roles, legal and regulatory issues, and payment systems.  It also addresses health reform initiatives in the US.

    This component explains specific terminology used by workers in health care and public health. This is NOT a course in data representation or standards.

    This is a laboratory component.  Students will work with simulated systems or real systems with simulated data.  As they play the role of practitioners using these systems, they will learn what is happening “under the hood.”  They will experience threats to security and appreciate the need for standards, high levels of usability, and how errors can occur. Materials must support hands-on experience in computer labs and on-site in health organizations.

    This component explains specific terminology used by workers in health care and public health. This is NOT a course in data representation or standards.

    This component is a survey of how healthcare and public health are organized and services delivered in the US.  It covers public policy, relevant organizations and their interrelationships, professional roles, legal and regulatory issues, and payment systems.  It also addresses health reform initiatives in the US.

    This component explains specific terminology used by workers in health care and public health. This is NOT a course in data representation or standards.

    For individuals not familiar with healthcare, this component addresses job expectations in healthcare settings.  It discusses how care is organized within a practice setting, privacy laws, and professional and ethical issues encountered in the workplace.

    The component, Health Management Information Systems, is a “theory” component that provides an introduction to health care applications and the systems that use them, health information technology standards, health-related data structures, and enterprise architecture in health care organizations.

    This component covers fundamentals of selection, installation and maintenance of typical Electronic Health Records (EHR) systems. Students will be introduced to the principles underlying system configuration including basic hardware and software components, principles of system selection, planning, testing, troubleshooting, and final deployment.  System security and procedures will also be introduced in this component.

    This is a laboratory component.  Students will work with simulated systems or real systems with simulated data.  As they play the role of practitioners using these systems, they will learn what is happening “under the hood.”  They will experience threats to security and appreciate the need for standards, high levels of usability, and how errors can occur. Materials must support hands-on experience in computer labs and on-site in health organizations.

    This component provides a practical experience with a laboratory component (utilizing the VistA for Education program) that will address approaches to assessing, selecting, and configuring EHRs to meet the specific needs of customers and end-users.

    This component covers fundamentals of health workflow process analysis and redesign as a necessary component of complete practice automation.  Process validation and change management are also covered. 

    The component, Health Management Information Systems, is a “theory” component that provides an introduction to health care applications and the systems that use them, health information technology standards, health-related data structures, and enterprise architecture in health care organizations.

    This component traces the development of IT systems in health care and public health, beginning with the experiments of the 1950s and 1960s and culminating in the HITECH act, including the introduction of the concept of “meaningful use” of electronic health records.

    This component covers fundamentals of selection, installation and maintenance of typical Electronic Health Records (EHR) systems. Students will be introduced to the principles underlying system configuration including basic hardware and software components, principles of system selection, planning, testing, troubleshooting, and final deployment.  System security and procedures will also be introduced in this component.

    This component is a survey of how healthcare and public health are organized and services delivered in the US.  It covers public policy, relevant organizations and their interrelationships, professional roles, legal and regulatory issues, and payment systems.  It also addresses health reform initiatives in the US.

    For students without an IT background, this Component provides a basic overview of computer architecture; data organization, representation and structure; structure of programming languages; networking and data communication.  It also includes basic terminology of computing.

    Introduction to Project Management

    An understanding of project management tools and techniques that results in the ability to create and follow a project management plan.

    This unit will address the OSI, including the purpose and content of each of its seven layers:  physical, data link, network, transport, session, presentation, and application. Products, processes, protocols and tools at each level will be explained. This unit will also focus on the flow of data through the models as data is transmitted and receive by end devices.

    This component targets those preparing for leadership roles, principles of leadership and effective management of teams.  Emphasis on the leadership modes and styles best suited to IT deployment.

    This component develops the skills necessary to communicate effectively across the full range of roles that will be encountered in healthcare and public health settings.

    This component is specifically for individuals interested in a career in public health. This component will provide an overview of specialized public health applications such as registries, epidemiological databases, biosurvelliance, public health reporting alerts, quality reporting, and how to adopt/use of population health functions for electronic health records and consumer functions for personal health records. In addition, this component will address the potential of public health information technology for health promotion and chronic disease prevention.

    Quality Improvement introduces the concepts of health IT and practice workflow redesign as instruments of quality improvement.  It addresses establishing a culture that supports increased quality and safety. It also discusses approaches to assessing patient safety issues and implementing quality management and reporting through electronic systems.

    This component explains specific terminology used by workers in health care and public health. This is NOT a course in data representation or standards.

    For individuals not familiar with healthcare, this component addresses job expectations in healthcare settings.  It discusses how care is organized within a practice setting, privacy laws, and professional and ethical issues encountered in the workplace.

    Training and Instructional Design

    This component will provide an overview of learning management systems, instructional design software tools, teaching techniques and strategies, evaluation of learner competencies, maintenance of training records, and measurement of training program effectiveness. In addition, this component will discuss selecting and implementing Web 2.0 technologies as instructional technologies given a specific platform and training programs.

    This component will discussion of rapid prototyping, user-centered design understanding effects of new technology workflow on downstream processes; facilitation of unit-wide focus groups or simulation.

    This component will provide an in-depth discussion in Vendor-Specific Systems, focusing specifically in areas such as system and database architectures used in commercial Electronic Health Records (EHRs), vendor strategies for terminology, knowledge management, ways to assess decision support capabilities in EHRs, and finally vendor-specific training (go-live strategies). 

    This is a laboratory component.  Students will work with simulated systems or real systems with simulated data.  As they play the role of practitioners using these systems, they will learn what is happening “under the hood.”  They will experience threats to security and appreciate the need for standards, high levels of usability, and how errors can occur. Materials must support hands-on experience in computer labs and on-site in health organizations.

    This component provides a practical experience with a laboratory component (utilizing the VistA for Education program) that will address approaches to assessing, selecting, and configuring EHRs to meet the specific needs of customers and end-users.

    This component covers fundamentals of health workflow process analysis and redesign as a necessary component of complete practice automation.  Process validation and change management are also covered. 

    The component, Health Management Information Systems, is a “theory” component that provides an introduction to health care applications and the systems that use them, health information technology standards, health-related data structures, and enterprise architecture in health care organizations.

    This component covers fundamentals of selection, installation and maintenance of typical Electronic Health Records (EHR) systems. Students will be introduced to the principles underlying system configuration including basic hardware and software components, principles of system selection, planning, testing, troubleshooting, and final deployment.  System security and procedures will also be introduced in this component.

    Training and Instructional Design

    This component will provide an overview of learning management systems, instructional design software tools, teaching techniques and strategies, evaluation of learner competencies, maintenance of training records, and measurement of training program effectiveness. In addition, this component will discuss selecting and implementing Web 2.0 technologies as instructional technologies given a specific platform and training programs.

    This component will discussion of rapid prototyping, user-centered design understanding effects of new technology workflow on downstream processes; facilitation of unit-wide focus groups or simulation.

    This component will provide an in-depth discussion in Vendor-Specific Systems, focusing specifically in areas such as system and database architectures used in commercial Electronic Health Records (EHRs), vendor strategies for terminology, knowledge management, ways to assess decision support capabilities in EHRs, and finally vendor-specific training (go-live strategies). 

    This is a laboratory component.  Students will work with simulated systems or real systems with simulated data.  As they play the role of practitioners using these systems, they will learn what is happening “under the hood.”  They will experience threats to security and appreciate the need for standards, high levels of usability, and how errors can occur. Materials must support hands-on experience in computer labs and on-site in health organizations.

    This component is a survey of how healthcare and public health are organized and services delivered in the US.  It covers public policy, relevant organizations and their interrelationships, professional roles, legal and regulatory issues, and payment systems.  It also addresses health reform initiatives in the US.

    This component explains specific terminology used by workers in health care and public health. This is NOT a course in data representation or standards.

    The component, Health Management Information Systems, is a “theory” component that provides an introduction to health care applications and the systems that use them, health information technology standards, health-related data structures, and enterprise architecture in health care organizations.

    This is a laboratory component.  Students will work with simulated systems or real systems with simulated data.  As they play the role of practitioners using these systems, they will learn what is happening “under the hood.”  They will experience threats to security and appreciate the need for standards, high levels of usability, and how errors can occur. Materials must support hands-on experience in computer labs and on-site in health organizations.

    This component is a survey of how healthcare and public health are organized and services delivered in the US.  It covers public policy, relevant organizations and their interrelationships, professional roles, legal and regulatory issues, and payment systems.  It also addresses health reform initiatives in the US.

    This component explains specific terminology used by workers in health care and public health. This is NOT a course in data representation or standards.

    The component, Health Management Information Systems, is a “theory” component that provides an introduction to health care applications and the systems that use them, health information technology standards, health-related data structures, and enterprise architecture in health care organizations.

    This is a laboratory component.  Students will work with simulated systems or real systems with simulated data.  As they play the role of practitioners using these systems, they will learn what is happening “under the hood.”  They will experience threats to security and appreciate the need for standards, high levels of usability, and how errors can occur. Materials must support hands-on experience in computer labs and on-site in health organizations.

    This component develops the skills necessary to communicate effectively across the full range of roles that will be encountered in healthcare and public health settings.